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Trouble with Comics

twiststreet:

Comic Book nerd stuff OR “Never look at twitter never look at twitter never look at twitter” OR I hope the rest of your dashboard makes up for this I’m so sorry: All these guys ever only have is one fucking move— talk about how there are Bad Fans in the world. Bad, bad fans! What a woe it is to live in a world with comic book fans in it; what a tragedy it must be for him!
Oh, p.s., this is the same day we’re hearing about him spreading malicious gossip about a woman in his industry because she refused to blow him in a park like this was a pre-AIDS world.
But the Move is always the Move, man— blame the fans, blame the fans, blame the fans. Look at this pity-party!!! “The mean old fans are making me want to quit— please send me reassuring tweets about how I’m the Big Victim here. I’m the Victim today— me!" He’s just looking to get blown again— this is just how people do that now, electronically…
Maybe, maybe, maybe he’s not grotesquely exaggerating something he was sent— though between you me and the wall… but let’s say hypothetically he got something unpleasant. That’s a shame— it’s a shame that there are unpleasant people who use the internet, and that we don’t live in the magical candy gumdrop society where people use the internet to be their best selves. “It’s a shame there are some bad eggs out there," we on the internet have to say, just as apparently now men who work in comics have-to / are-going-to-try-to say thanks to Brian Wood. I guess we are all stuck in that same life-raft together called life… electric word, life… But what fascinates regardless is the response, this poetic the-soundtrack-is-only-a-flute imagery where he’s walking into a sunset— sure, like all those wonderful cowboy movies where the cowboy splits town at the end after yelling at girls for not going to their hotel rooms to "prove they deserve to be in comics" or whatever the hell the pitch was. Was that how Young Guns 3 ended? "Reap the whirlwind, Brady. Reap it. Or else I’ll tell Lying in the Gutters you totes reaped it and everyone will believe me and not you.”
He in no way sees that the mentality that he’s doing the world some kind of fucking favor by making Star Wars comics or whatever it is he makes— that comics isn’t some big wonderful thing that he’s gotten to be a part of, but is some thing that he’s SAVING— sure, let’s draw no lines between that sort of complex and the story’s he’s found himself in…

I don’t disagree with anything Abhay writes here, but I don’t think even bringing up fans—either the “poor Brian, stay strong buddy!” ones or the “Wood’s a scumbag, let’s burn his comics!” ones, is very useful. The internet provides abundant proof every day that most people can barely string a coherent, reasoned thought together, which is why there are so many bad writers in comics who continue to get work. 
Now, when I started writing this last night, I was rambling all over the place, and as my buddy Alan noted, burying the lede. I do that sometimes. But with a day gone by and now another woman, Anne Scherbina, coming forward with her Brian Wood horror story, I felt like just pitching most of what I wrote and get down to basics. Now, Brian Wood can try to convince a woman to have sex with him if he wants to, whether he was in a relationship or married now or whatever. That may be immoral, but it’s not one of the main issues here, which are 1) He was verbally abusive and/or slanderous about the women who turned him down, 2) No one to the best of our knowledge reprimanded him for it, and 3) in his tweets and the emails that have been published, he can’t simply apologize for hurting these women and promise to do better or to try to learn from the experiences. He wants to play the victim, or feign ignorance or lack of recollection to diminish the effect of the claims of his victims. And yes, I call them victims. Not rape victims, but clearly these are people whom Wood has brought pain to. Trying to initiate sex and being denied and politely if awkwardly dropping the matter is not as big a deal. Yes, that can cause pain as well, if the person you make a pass at thought of you only as a friend or colleague and now an established trust is altered or shattered, but that’s still a ways away from yelling at someone in public about standing you up and their lack of talent, or starting a nasty, untrue rumor about you performing sex acts in a storeroom. Brian Wood, I hope that whatever pain and loneliness he was in is better now, and he may well have become a good mate and father, but the fact is, he left behind some people he hurt and his attempts at acknowledging this are coming up pretty hollow, selfish and immature. Now, I do hate how easy it can be to throw stones and get an angry mob started up—it’s not that hard to boycott a guy who doesn’t sell comics unless they’re licensed properties like Star Wars or Conan—so I should point out I’ve had my share of regrettable incidents, too. Not along the lines of being abusive or rumormongering, but times where I realized that wasn’t the type of person I strive to be, that there was a moment where I made someone uncomfortable and didn’t mean to and had to apologize. Life is full of impulses acted upon in order to fulfill one’s desires, and along the way, sometimes other people get hurt in that pursuit. But the goal has to be to bring as little pain in to other people’s lives as you can; “Do no harm,” as I think the Hippocratic Oath goes. And when you do, own it, apologize without qualifications and try to learn from it. Hopefully, if Wood isn’t able to do this, at least some guys out there will take something from it. I really have a lot of respect for both Fowler and Scherbina for bringing these stories forward and dealing with the masses weighing in and judging and equivocating and accusing. They’re really putting other people ahead of themselves, which no one can say about Wood or, apparently, a lot of this male-dominated industry. 
--Christopher Allen
19 November 2013

twiststreet:

Comic Book nerd stuff OR “Never look at twitter never look at twitter never look at twitter” OR I hope the rest of your dashboard makes up for this I’m so sorry: All these guys ever only have is one fucking move— talk about how there are Bad Fans in the world. Bad, bad fans! What a woe it is to live in a world with comic book fans in it; what a tragedy it must be for him!

Oh, p.s., this is the same day we’re hearing about him spreading malicious gossip about a woman in his industry because she refused to blow him in a park like this was a pre-AIDS world.

But the Move is always the Move, man— blame the fans, blame the fans, blame the fans. Look at this pity-party!!! “The mean old fans are making me want to quit— please send me reassuring tweets about how I’m the Big Victim here. I’m the Victim today— me!" He’s just looking to get blown again— this is just how people do that now, electronically…

Maybe, maybe, maybe he’s not grotesquely exaggerating something he was sent— though between you me and the wall… but let’s say hypothetically he got something unpleasant. That’s a shame— it’s a shame that there are unpleasant people who use the internet, and that we don’t live in the magical candy gumdrop society where people use the internet to be their best selves. “It’s a shame there are some bad eggs out there," we on the internet have to say, just as apparently now men who work in comics have-to / are-going-to-try-to say thanks to Brian Wood. I guess we are all stuck in that same life-raft together called life… electric word, life… But what fascinates regardless is the response, this poetic the-soundtrack-is-only-a-flute imagery where he’s walking into a sunset— sure, like all those wonderful cowboy movies where the cowboy splits town at the end after yelling at girls for not going to their hotel rooms to "prove they deserve to be in comics" or whatever the hell the pitch was. Was that how Young Guns 3 ended? "Reap the whirlwind, Brady. Reap it. Or else I’ll tell Lying in the Gutters you totes reaped it and everyone will believe me and not you.

He in no way sees that the mentality that he’s doing the world some kind of fucking favor by making Star Wars comics or whatever it is he makes— that comics isn’t some big wonderful thing that he’s gotten to be a part of, but is some thing that he’s SAVING— sure, let’s draw no lines between that sort of complex and the story’s he’s found himself in…

I don’t disagree with anything Abhay writes here, but I don’t think even bringing up fans—either the “poor Brian, stay strong buddy!” ones or the “Wood’s a scumbag, let’s burn his comics!” ones, is very useful. The internet provides abundant proof every day that most people can barely string a coherent, reasoned thought together, which is why there are so many bad writers in comics who continue to get work. 

Now, when I started writing this last night, I was rambling all over the place, and as my buddy Alan noted, burying the lede. I do that sometimes. But with a day gone by and now another woman, Anne Scherbina, coming forward with her Brian Wood horror story, I felt like just pitching most of what I wrote and get down to basics. Now, Brian Wood can try to convince a woman to have sex with him if he wants to, whether he was in a relationship or married now or whatever. That may be immoral, but it’s not one of the main issues here, which are 1) He was verbally abusive and/or slanderous about the women who turned him down, 2) No one to the best of our knowledge reprimanded him for it, and 3) in his tweets and the emails that have been published, he can’t simply apologize for hurting these women and promise to do better or to try to learn from the experiences. He wants to play the victim, or feign ignorance or lack of recollection to diminish the effect of the claims of his victims. And yes, I call them victims. Not rape victims, but clearly these are people whom Wood has brought pain to. Trying to initiate sex and being denied and politely if awkwardly dropping the matter is not as big a deal. Yes, that can cause pain as well, if the person you make a pass at thought of you only as a friend or colleague and now an established trust is altered or shattered, but that’s still a ways away from yelling at someone in public about standing you up and their lack of talent, or starting a nasty, untrue rumor about you performing sex acts in a storeroom. Brian Wood, I hope that whatever pain and loneliness he was in is better now, and he may well have become a good mate and father, but the fact is, he left behind some people he hurt and his attempts at acknowledging this are coming up pretty hollow, selfish and immature. Now, I do hate how easy it can be to throw stones and get an angry mob started up—it’s not that hard to boycott a guy who doesn’t sell comics unless they’re licensed properties like Star Wars or Conan—so I should point out I’ve had my share of regrettable incidents, too. Not along the lines of being abusive or rumormongering, but times where I realized that wasn’t the type of person I strive to be, that there was a moment where I made someone uncomfortable and didn’t mean to and had to apologize. Life is full of impulses acted upon in order to fulfill one’s desires, and along the way, sometimes other people get hurt in that pursuit. But the goal has to be to bring as little pain in to other people’s lives as you can; “Do no harm,” as I think the Hippocratic Oath goes. And when you do, own it, apologize without qualifications and try to learn from it. Hopefully, if Wood isn’t able to do this, at least some guys out there will take something from it. I really have a lot of respect for both Fowler and Scherbina for bringing these stories forward and dealing with the masses weighing in and judging and equivocating and accusing. They’re really putting other people ahead of themselves, which no one can say about Wood or, apparently, a lot of this male-dominated industry. 

--Christopher Allen

19 November 2013

Massive Dump

And another series drops off my list as Brian Wood’s The Massive #2 shows that Wood, at times, forgets how to write anything someone would want to read. Dystopic adventure on the high seas, motherfucker! You have to work to make that boring, but Wood succeeds, with still-empty characters and almost nothing happening. Exotic names like Kamchatka and some statistics aren’t what readers want. Give us something happening, and happening to people we care about. I really wanted to like this series, and I say this without any rancor, because I know Wood can write good work sometimes, but it’s terrible.

The Massive #1

Writer/Creator: Brian Wood

Artist: Kristian Donaldson

Dark Horse Comics. $3.50 USD

Brian Wood is back with another dystopic science fiction comic. But unlike DMZ, this one is set on water. That makes sense, as global warming is going to melt the polar ice caps and cover more land. But this isn’t Waterworld. It feels much more inspired by the Discovery Channel show, Whale Wars. Wood takes a serious gamble on credibility with his lead character Callum Israel (“Call Him Ishmail?”), captain of a ship called the Kapital, a kind of ecoterrorist who’s now searching for sister ship, The Massive. As one would expect, there’s quite a bit of exposition, introduction of characters (his first mate doesn’t have anything interesting to do, another crew member, Mary, is tough and appears to be his girlfriend). They fight some pirates, they head to the half-submerged Hong Kong, we end.

I notice Wood holds the sole copyright on this one, so I’m guessing there will be another artist after the first story arc. Which is good, because Donaldson is boring, with a style like a much more controlled, detailed, but stiff John Romita, Jr. True, Wood gives him a lot of scenes of people talking on a shit, but hey, there’s some fighting and that should be more fun to watch. 

I don’t mean to be too hard on the book, but look, this should have been a real kick in the ass. Disaster, adventure on the high seas, a world we knew lost forever, a quest…Instead we get some dry exposition, an action scene that wasn’t any fun at all and seemed to be included almost under protest, and so far, dull characters. It also suffers from Too-Good-Cover Syndrome, where a killer cover (in this case, two: a majestic shot by Wood himself and an otherworldly image of a jellyfish just beneath the surface by Rafael Grampa) makes the reader ache when he sees the ho-hum art inside. I think Wood can write, and there’s nothing wrong with the premise, but the execution needed work. Hopefully it can pick up steam in a hurry.

Christopher Allen