Trouble with Comics

Jan 14

ADD Review Copy Address Update

One of the things I hope to do more of in the year ahead is reviewing comics and graphic novels. And it occurs to me that I have not updated my address since moving last summer. So if you are a creator, publisher or publicist and want to send a review copy my way, please send it to me at:

Alan David Doane
Trouble With Comics Reviews
24-B Birch Avenue
Glens Falls, NY 12801

Thanks!

Jan 12

Last Alan Moore Interview? -

Aside from the needlessly overblown title (Moore makes it clear he’ll be game for more interviews in the future when it suits his purposes; he’ll just be more selective now), this is a typically excellent, and even more hilarious than usual interview with the fine, put-upon author. At the same time, it’s depressing, because this is Moore agreeing to answer the “questions no one has dared ask before,” seemingly because they’re so sensational and crudely posed that one supposes they could only get to Moore through the Trojan Horse of O’Mealoid, who’d already established a convivial professional relationship with Moore. If you’ve ever wondered when Moore would get tired of remaining mostly mum on the subject of Grant Morrison, this is that moment, though thankfully it’s more than that, including thoughtful explanations on the controversial (to some) use of the Golliwogg in his League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, and whether he agrees with the unqualified assertion that his body of work contains a prevalence of rape against women in it. 

Dec 21

Let's Talk About Scott Lobdell -

Go read this thoughtful autopsy of Scott Lobdell’s non-apology for being a sexist asshole, written by postcardsfromspace:

Long story short: A few days ago, cartoonist MariNaomi wrote an op-ed about being harassed by professional comic-book writer Scott Lobdell on a panel at a convention. MariNaomi was very careful to avoid identifying information, but Lobdell apparently read the piece and recognized himself—maybe…

Dec 13

Dead Differential: Character Differences in The Walking Dead

Guest post by Kevin T. Fischer

There are quite a lot of differences between The Walking Dead television series and the ongoing comic series it’s based on. You could honestly fill an entire blog with everything from the difference in pace to the more superficial differences of color scheme. However, the one big difference that has been a point of contention between fans of the show and fans of the comic is the characters.

While many of the iconic comic characters have manifested in the show, the portrayals have not been quite so consistent. In some cases, the interpretations of the characters differ so greatly between the versions that they seem less like parallels of one another. These differences of character have also shaped and informed the progression of their respective plots, leading to wildly divergent experiences.

Below are just some of the major character differences between the AMC show and the comic:

Rick

In the show: Rick is the de facto leader of his group of survivors who gets thrust into some pretty difficult decisions. As the series continues, he makes some very serious mistakes that cost lives and is, initially, slow to learn just what it takes to survive in this new world. His progression is, admittedly, slower but more organic as he learns new life lessons and really struggles under the burden of leadership.

In the comic: Rick is still the quintessential leader, but he’s also quick to acknowledge and accept the circumstances surrounding Lori and Shane. He also endures tremendous psychological and physical trauma from pivotal moments like losing his right hand to the Governor, seeing his wife and daughter killed by a sniper and almost losing his son, Carl, on two separate occasions to gunshot wounds.

Shane

In the show: Shane played out his part of the Lori and Rick love triangle for twice as long as the comic. You also got to know him better, as a result. The final confrontation between Shane and Rick is also motivated largely by Lori, and it ends with Rick stabbing him and Carl shooting his zombie form.

In the comic: Shane is wrapped up by Issue #6 when he tries to murder Rick during a deer hunt. The real difference between this final confrontation and the previous is that Carl, without hesitation, fires on Shane – saving his father’s life.

Andrea

In the show: Andrea was emotionally indecisive and a bit of an opportunist – out for herself more than anyone else. She also was a bit of a liability, prone to suicide and accidentally firing on one of her own people – mistaking them for a zombie. Recently, she is among the dead.

In the comic: Andrea is still alive and well. She has grown to be an uncanny marksman, capable of shooting a person’s finger off with surgical precision. In addition to her prowess as a warrior, Andrea is a stalwart hero who serves as Rick’s second-in-command and on-again-off-again lover.

The Governor

In the show: The Governor was a deeply disturbed individual who wantonly murdered anyone he felt was a threat to his town. In that way, they attempted to justify and redeem his character to the audience. A lot of his hostile tendencies veered into the realm of physical trauma.

In the comic: The Governor was irredeemably malicious with not a single shred of hope or compassion. He repeatedly assaulted and abused Michonne when he had her in custody and was unhealthily involved with his zombified daughter. His right eye and right arm were cut off by Michonne before he was shot by one of his own people.

Carl

In the show: Carl continues to descend into violence as he is forced to make life or death decisions no child his age should ever make. He has killed people both in defense and in cold blood and even had to shoot his own mother to ensure she didn’t come back as a zombie.

In the comic: Carl experiences a remarkable amount of pain and suffering in a short amount of time. Not long after witnessing the murder of his mother and little sister, he caught a stray bullet that obliterated an entire half of his face. These experiences coupled with how quickly he’ll resort to a gun have all twisted him into the violent murderer we know him as today. That being said, he still has enough perspective and self-awareness to keep from veering into irredeemable, Governor Territory.

Daryl and Merle

In the show: Daryl and Merle were just a couple of good old boys out for themselves in this post-apocalyptic world. When they were separated, however, Daryl began to evolve and become a likable anti-hero while Merle only got worse. In the end, Daryl is the one you root for as a hero with some rough edges, while Merle finally met his end.

In the comic: Daryl and Merle are regrettably absent from the comic.

Those are some of the more prominent differences in the characters which, ultimately, affect the overall experiences of both the comic and the show. In the end, The Walking Dead comic and show are both great stories – the differences just help keep things from getting repetitive.

Dec 04

The End For Now -

fantagraphics:

pictureboxinc:

As of December 31, 2013, PictureBox will no longer release any new titles. This was not an easy decision, but the company is no longer feasible for me as a thoroughgoing venture. Change is, as the cliché goes, a good thing, and I am proud of PictureBox the idea and the company, and grateful to the…

Our good friends are shuttering their publishing operations and we wish them well. Look for Dan’s continued co-stewardship over at TCJ.com.

Not great news, but the coldblooded consumer can get 50% off everything on the site. I picked up Frank Santoro’s Pompeii, C.F.’s Mere and Blutch’s So Long, Silver Screen.

—Chris

Nov 24

ADD’s Comics DNA

I missed seeing Tom Spurgeon’s Five for Friday post a few days ago, but the subject was a really good one and it got my brain looking back over my own personal history, so I thought I’d post my answers here. You can see everyone else’s responses at FFF Results Post #358 — Comics Reading DNA at The Comics Repporter.

Comics Reporter readers were asked to name as specifically as possible:

1) The First Comic Of Any Kind You Remember Reading

I’ve tried to narrow that down, and I think it’s Amazing Spider-Man somewhere right after Gwen Stacy died. 

2) A Comic That Got You Back Into Reading A Certain Kind Of Comic After You’d Given Up On That Kind Of Comic

Avengers #1, the Heroes Return era by Busiek and Perez. Superhero comics had completely lost me in the 1990s, but Perez back on Avengers made me curious and the easy professionalism and obvious fun Busiek and Perez were having bought me back. It’s a good bet I might never have gotten so involved in comics again had this book not existed, so blame Busiek and Perez for Comic Book Galaxy and Trouble With Comics even ever existing, if you like.

3) A Comic That Got You Reading A Different Type Of Comic Altogether

Either The First Kingdom or Elfquest led me to what we then called ground-level comics, and FantaCo really opened the floodgates with Hembeck, Smilin’ Ed, Gates of Eden and more.

4) A Comic That Made You Want To Make Comics Even If You Never Made Them

Oh, hell, any good comic makes me feel that way. I did make scores of them in the early ’80s, probably inspired by the black and white alternatives I was reading.

5) A Comic That Represents A Kind Of Comic You Have Yet To Explore

I don’t know that there are any genres or kinds of comics I haven’t explored. But I do know my interest in comics about people who can fly or have bolts shooting out of their hands has never been lower than it is now, due to the shoddy quality of most superhero comics right now and the insipidity of the comics culture overall.

— Alan David Doane

Nov 20

twiststreet:

Comic Book nerd stuff OR “Never look at twitter never look at twitter never look at twitter” OR I hope the rest of your dashboard makes up for this I’m so sorry: All these guys ever only have is one fucking move— talk about how there are Bad Fans in the world. Bad, bad fans! What a woe it is to live in a world with comic book fans in it; what a tragedy it must be for him!
Oh, p.s., this is the same day we’re hearing about him spreading malicious gossip about a woman in his industry because she refused to blow him in a park like this was a pre-AIDS world.
But the Move is always the Move, man— blame the fans, blame the fans, blame the fans. Look at this pity-party!!! “The mean old fans are making me want to quit— please send me reassuring tweets about how I’m the Big Victim here. I’m the Victim today— me!" He’s just looking to get blown again— this is just how people do that now, electronically…
Maybe, maybe, maybe he’s not grotesquely exaggerating something he was sent— though between you me and the wall… but let’s say hypothetically he got something unpleasant. That’s a shame— it’s a shame that there are unpleasant people who use the internet, and that we don’t live in the magical candy gumdrop society where people use the internet to be their best selves. “It’s a shame there are some bad eggs out there," we on the internet have to say, just as apparently now men who work in comics have-to / are-going-to-try-to say thanks to Brian Wood. I guess we are all stuck in that same life-raft together called life… electric word, life… But what fascinates regardless is the response, this poetic the-soundtrack-is-only-a-flute imagery where he’s walking into a sunset— sure, like all those wonderful cowboy movies where the cowboy splits town at the end after yelling at girls for not going to their hotel rooms to "prove they deserve to be in comics" or whatever the hell the pitch was. Was that how Young Guns 3 ended? "Reap the whirlwind, Brady. Reap it. Or else I’ll tell Lying in the Gutters you totes reaped it and everyone will believe me and not you.”
He in no way sees that the mentality that he’s doing the world some kind of fucking favor by making Star Wars comics or whatever it is he makes— that comics isn’t some big wonderful thing that he’s gotten to be a part of, but is some thing that he’s SAVING— sure, let’s draw no lines between that sort of complex and the story’s he’s found himself in…

I don’t disagree with anything Abhay writes here, but I don’t think even bringing up fans—either the “poor Brian, stay strong buddy!” ones or the “Wood’s a scumbag, let’s burn his comics!” ones, is very useful. The internet provides abundant proof every day that most people can barely string a coherent, reasoned thought together, which is why there are so many bad writers in comics who continue to get work. 
Now, when I started writing this last night, I was rambling all over the place, and as my buddy Alan noted, burying the lede. I do that sometimes. But with a day gone by and now another woman, Anne Scherbina, coming forward with her Brian Wood horror story, I felt like just pitching most of what I wrote and get down to basics. Now, Brian Wood can try to convince a woman to have sex with him if he wants to, whether he was in a relationship or married now or whatever. That may be immoral, but it’s not one of the main issues here, which are 1) He was verbally abusive and/or slanderous about the women who turned him down, 2) No one to the best of our knowledge reprimanded him for it, and 3) in his tweets and the emails that have been published, he can’t simply apologize for hurting these women and promise to do better or to try to learn from the experiences. He wants to play the victim, or feign ignorance or lack of recollection to diminish the effect of the claims of his victims. And yes, I call them victims. Not rape victims, but clearly these are people whom Wood has brought pain to. Trying to initiate sex and being denied and politely if awkwardly dropping the matter is not as big a deal. Yes, that can cause pain as well, if the person you make a pass at thought of you only as a friend or colleague and now an established trust is altered or shattered, but that’s still a ways away from yelling at someone in public about standing you up and their lack of talent, or starting a nasty, untrue rumor about you performing sex acts in a storeroom. Brian Wood, I hope that whatever pain and loneliness he was in is better now, and he may well have become a good mate and father, but the fact is, he left behind some people he hurt and his attempts at acknowledging this are coming up pretty hollow, selfish and immature. Now, I do hate how easy it can be to throw stones and get an angry mob started up—it’s not that hard to boycott a guy who doesn’t sell comics unless they’re licensed properties like Star Wars or Conan—so I should point out I’ve had my share of regrettable incidents, too. Not along the lines of being abusive or rumormongering, but times where I realized that wasn’t the type of person I strive to be, that there was a moment where I made someone uncomfortable and didn’t mean to and had to apologize. Life is full of impulses acted upon in order to fulfill one’s desires, and along the way, sometimes other people get hurt in that pursuit. But the goal has to be to bring as little pain in to other people’s lives as you can; “Do no harm,” as I think the Hippocratic Oath goes. And when you do, own it, apologize without qualifications and try to learn from it. Hopefully, if Wood isn’t able to do this, at least some guys out there will take something from it. I really have a lot of respect for both Fowler and Scherbina for bringing these stories forward and dealing with the masses weighing in and judging and equivocating and accusing. They’re really putting other people ahead of themselves, which no one can say about Wood or, apparently, a lot of this male-dominated industry. 
--Christopher Allen
19 November 2013

twiststreet:

Comic Book nerd stuff OR “Never look at twitter never look at twitter never look at twitter” OR I hope the rest of your dashboard makes up for this I’m so sorry: All these guys ever only have is one fucking move— talk about how there are Bad Fans in the world. Bad, bad fans! What a woe it is to live in a world with comic book fans in it; what a tragedy it must be for him!

Oh, p.s., this is the same day we’re hearing about him spreading malicious gossip about a woman in his industry because she refused to blow him in a park like this was a pre-AIDS world.

But the Move is always the Move, man— blame the fans, blame the fans, blame the fans. Look at this pity-party!!! “The mean old fans are making me want to quit— please send me reassuring tweets about how I’m the Big Victim here. I’m the Victim today— me!" He’s just looking to get blown again— this is just how people do that now, electronically…

Maybe, maybe, maybe he’s not grotesquely exaggerating something he was sent— though between you me and the wall… but let’s say hypothetically he got something unpleasant. That’s a shame— it’s a shame that there are unpleasant people who use the internet, and that we don’t live in the magical candy gumdrop society where people use the internet to be their best selves. “It’s a shame there are some bad eggs out there," we on the internet have to say, just as apparently now men who work in comics have-to / are-going-to-try-to say thanks to Brian Wood. I guess we are all stuck in that same life-raft together called life… electric word, life… But what fascinates regardless is the response, this poetic the-soundtrack-is-only-a-flute imagery where he’s walking into a sunset— sure, like all those wonderful cowboy movies where the cowboy splits town at the end after yelling at girls for not going to their hotel rooms to "prove they deserve to be in comics" or whatever the hell the pitch was. Was that how Young Guns 3 ended? "Reap the whirlwind, Brady. Reap it. Or else I’ll tell Lying in the Gutters you totes reaped it and everyone will believe me and not you.

He in no way sees that the mentality that he’s doing the world some kind of fucking favor by making Star Wars comics or whatever it is he makes— that comics isn’t some big wonderful thing that he’s gotten to be a part of, but is some thing that he’s SAVING— sure, let’s draw no lines between that sort of complex and the story’s he’s found himself in…

I don’t disagree with anything Abhay writes here, but I don’t think even bringing up fans—either the “poor Brian, stay strong buddy!” ones or the “Wood’s a scumbag, let’s burn his comics!” ones, is very useful. The internet provides abundant proof every day that most people can barely string a coherent, reasoned thought together, which is why there are so many bad writers in comics who continue to get work. 

Now, when I started writing this last night, I was rambling all over the place, and as my buddy Alan noted, burying the lede. I do that sometimes. But with a day gone by and now another woman, Anne Scherbina, coming forward with her Brian Wood horror story, I felt like just pitching most of what I wrote and get down to basics. Now, Brian Wood can try to convince a woman to have sex with him if he wants to, whether he was in a relationship or married now or whatever. That may be immoral, but it’s not one of the main issues here, which are 1) He was verbally abusive and/or slanderous about the women who turned him down, 2) No one to the best of our knowledge reprimanded him for it, and 3) in his tweets and the emails that have been published, he can’t simply apologize for hurting these women and promise to do better or to try to learn from the experiences. He wants to play the victim, or feign ignorance or lack of recollection to diminish the effect of the claims of his victims. And yes, I call them victims. Not rape victims, but clearly these are people whom Wood has brought pain to. Trying to initiate sex and being denied and politely if awkwardly dropping the matter is not as big a deal. Yes, that can cause pain as well, if the person you make a pass at thought of you only as a friend or colleague and now an established trust is altered or shattered, but that’s still a ways away from yelling at someone in public about standing you up and their lack of talent, or starting a nasty, untrue rumor about you performing sex acts in a storeroom. Brian Wood, I hope that whatever pain and loneliness he was in is better now, and he may well have become a good mate and father, but the fact is, he left behind some people he hurt and his attempts at acknowledging this are coming up pretty hollow, selfish and immature. Now, I do hate how easy it can be to throw stones and get an angry mob started up—it’s not that hard to boycott a guy who doesn’t sell comics unless they’re licensed properties like Star Wars or Conan—so I should point out I’ve had my share of regrettable incidents, too. Not along the lines of being abusive or rumormongering, but times where I realized that wasn’t the type of person I strive to be, that there was a moment where I made someone uncomfortable and didn’t mean to and had to apologize. Life is full of impulses acted upon in order to fulfill one’s desires, and along the way, sometimes other people get hurt in that pursuit. But the goal has to be to bring as little pain in to other people’s lives as you can; “Do no harm,” as I think the Hippocratic Oath goes. And when you do, own it, apologize without qualifications and try to learn from it. Hopefully, if Wood isn’t able to do this, at least some guys out there will take something from it. I really have a lot of respect for both Fowler and Scherbina for bringing these stories forward and dealing with the masses weighing in and judging and equivocating and accusing. They’re really putting other people ahead of themselves, which no one can say about Wood or, apparently, a lot of this male-dominated industry. 

--Christopher Allen

19 November 2013

Nov 18

Creator Rights vs. Fan Ignorance: Look Stuff Up and Find Out For Yourself

This was originally in the comments thread of a 2009 post about Marvel publishing Marvelman/Miracleman. Considering how many comics readers are unaware or uninformed of the history and details of Marvel and DC’s abuse of creator rights, I thought it deserved its own post.

The history of the “Big Two,” is a history of lies, betrayals and broken promises. It’s very easy today to say “maybe he should have had the insight not to have worked with them in the first place,” about Alan Moore and a thousand other creators who have been screwed, blewed and tattooed (as Mom used to say), but the fact of the matter is that it’s far more complex than that, and if you truly have an interest in the subject, then you owe it to yourself to do some research.

Just one example, relevant to this post: Are you aware that, prior to Watchmen, no superhero graphic novel (and there were few enough of those anyway) was ever kept permanently in print? And that DC’s contract with Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons said that the rights to the work would revert to Moore and Gibbons once the book had (as all superhero graphic novels had in the past) gone out of print?

Then the work proved to transcend all previous precedent, and instead of keeping with the spirit of the written contract (there was absolutely NO historical reason at the time not to think Moore and Gibbons would not be given ownership of the work under this contract: it’s what Moore and Gibbons AND DC all expected to happen), the company kept the book in print, so far, quite permanently. To the extent that that goes, that’s understandable enough; it’s a hugely popular work. Where DC falls down in this example is in not somehow compensating Moore and Gibbons for the unexpected success of the work that changed the conditions under which the contract was written. Legally, of course, DC had the right to do what they wanted. But from a business and ethical standpoint, what they did was monumentally stupid: They permanently soured Moore on working for them (through this and many other actions — look up the “promotional” Watchmen watches, or the pulping of an issue of League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, or the Tomorrow Stories story that Top Shelf had to publish because DC didn’t have the courage — which I believe is how Moore ended up there; anyway, LOOK STUFF UP AND FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF). 

Dig out some old Comics Journals, Google creators rights, read some interviews with the injured parties, find out for yourself what those of us who have been watching the industry for decades are talking about. 

Find out what happened to Marv Wolfman when he made a claim to ownership of Blade. Find out how vague and meaningless the idea of “Copyright,” in comics was, especially prior to 1974. Do you know about the back-of-paycheck agreements the companies made creators sign in order to get paid? Did you know some of them regularly crossed it out, because they didn’t agree with it? I could go on all day.

A lot of injustice and malfeasance has been committed by corporate comics companies against the very people who make it possible for them to exist, but if the readers who enjoy their product would make an effort to understand the long and thorny history of corporate comics and creators rights, maybe those readers would think twice about blindly supporting the large corporations that have done so much harm to the people who created the very product in question.

— Alan David Doane

Happy Birthday, Alan Moore!

Today is the 60th birthday of Northampton’s hometown magician, Alan Moore. Why not spend the day reading or re-reading (or listening to!) some of the Moore-related articles we’ve posted over the years? Enjoy!

ADD’s Top 5 Alan Moore Works

Five Questions for Moore Biographer Lance Parkin

ADD’s Alan Moore Interview (MP3 download)

Christopher Allen on Before Watchmen

ADD on Moore’s Right To Say “No.”

All of 2009’s Alan Moore Month at TWC

Marshall O’Keeffe on Voice of the Fire

Hitler, Rape and Watchmen 2

ADD on LOEG: Century 1910

Flashmob Fridays on Moore’s Twilight Proposal

ADD’s Watchmen Movie Review

ADD’s Saga of the Swamp Thing Book One Review

ADD on Marvel and Marvelman Part One

ADD on Marvel and Marvelman Part Two

Nov 16

ADD’s Top 5 Alan Moore Works

Monday is Alan Moore’s 60th birthday, and I wish him every happiness on that (and every) day, both because I respect and admire his wit, talent and politics, and because he has brought me more unbounded joy over the last three decades than probably every other comic book creator combined. Beginning very early on in his Swamp Thing run and continuing through to the current day, a new Alan Moore book means surprise and delight, and sometimes a little bit of controversy.

Moore’s recent Nemo graphic novel with artist Kevin O’Neill shows that Moore’s passion for fun and exciting comic books that are also complex and thought-provoking hasn’t waned at all. Although the very mention of Moore can anger and aggravate aggrieved fanboys over-invested in the importance of corporate comic book culture in their lives, the fact of the matter is that Moore’s work mattered, and continues to matter, for the very reasons they despise him in their thousands: Moore puts his own needs before corporate whims, he gives readers what they need, not what they want (giving readers what they want, or think they want, is the very foundation Moore’s former publisher DC Comics has built its current loathsome line of books on), and most importantly, he uses his unique and brilliant intellect to construct complex and challenging works that demand you exercise your own mind in order to not only enjoy, but even to comprehend. It’s hard to imagine any of the work-for-hire prostitutes who applied their minor gifts to Before Watchmen against all rational, ethical decency being able to even read the first book on this list, never mind write something anywhere near as entertaining, challenging and soul-satisfying.

About this list: Lance Parkin answered this very same question recently in my Five Questions interview with him, and made the terrific point that “at heart the most important thing about Alan Moore is his writing.” I couldn’t agree more with that sentiment. I fully support Moore in his stance against the abuses of corporate comics publishers against creators unable to stem the tide of their perfidy, but I think oftentimes even Affable Al’s most fervent fans get so caught up in the rhetoric and invective (Glycon knows I have been guilty of this myself) that they forget to celebrate just how much fun Moore’s work almost always is. The worst of his work in comics, arguably some of the stuff he did for Image in the 1990s (examined and put in context in Parkin’s wonderful new biography Magic Words: The Extraordinary Life of Alan Moore), still contains the structure, humour and narrative left-turns that are trademarks of Moore’s style.

So here are the five Moore works that I find myself coming back to again and again, always entertained, always astonished by how fresh and vital they remain after a dozen reads or more.

Voice of the Fire

This is Moore’s greatest achievement to date, a prose novel that also functions as a collection of short stories and can be read and enjoyed as either. Each chapter is set in its own era, with its own characters, story and themes, but each combines as a whole to tell an alternative history of Moore’s hometown of Northampton and environs that is chilling, hilarious and mind-blowing. Anyone who has never approached this work because it’s “not comics” is denying themselves enjoyment of the most personal and powerful expression of the talent of the greatest writer comics has ever known.

Miracleman

Even though Swamp Thing got to the States first, Miracleman is the book that really showed the power of Moore’s gifts to change the way we think not only about comics, but about entertainment in general. And despite shipping delays, fill-in issues, mediocre art in some issues and an ethical and legal tangle that may never truly be understood, never mind sorted out, Moore’s run on this comic remains revolutionary, thrilling and timeless. I can’t recommend or endorse Marvel’s forthcoming reprints given their history of fucking with Moore and his work, but I do recommend you read these if you can and immerse yourself in probably Moore’s greatest superhero epic. Its impact and influence on entertainment since, in everything from comics to movies to television, cannot be overstated.

From Hell

Moore’s most complex and greatest work in comics to date, From Hell and Voice of The Fire convinced me that his interest in magic was truly informing his work in positive and unprecedented ways. There are moments in both books that will turn your brain inside out and leave you changed in ways that will last long after you close the cover and move on. There’s more technique and hardcore comics talent at work in From Hell than in 90 percent of every other comic book ever published, and at the same time, it’s also just one hell of a wild story, in comics form. It’s the one work of Moore’s that I recommend without reservation to anyone who wants to know why the man has the reputation that he does. In From Hell, Moore and artist Eddie Campbell prove beyond all doubt that, as Harvey Pekar believed, “You can do anything with words and pictures.” In From Hell, Moore and Campbell do everything.

Swamp Thing

A bit of a sentimental favourite, because it was the first Moore work I was ever exposed to. Despite Moore’s falling-out with artist Steve Bissette, their work along with John Totleben on Swamp Thing remains one of the greatest works DC ever published, and given how very shabbily the publisher treated Moore during their partnership and ever since, one supposes it’s kind of a miracle that it happened at all. But from the start of this run, I had the sense something different and more adult was happening in comic books, and I was right. Moore brought nuance and complexity to American comics with Swamp Thing, along with horror and dread and subtlety since unmatched. No one would ever again make Swamp Thing as important a title and character as Moore, Bissette and Totleben did, and in a world that makes sense, no one would have even tried. They said and did it all, and the run remains as vital and classic today as we knew it was even when it was shipping monthly to our local comic shops and drug stores. 

Wildcats

There’s a bit of proof of concept about Moore’s Wildcats run; Jim Lee had created a cookie-cutter X-Men ripoff for Image and imbued it with absolutely nothing worth talking about. When Moore took over the title, it immediately — immediately — became the wildest and most interesting superhero comic book on the stands. So if you want proof that Moore is the real thing, that he puts his money where his mouth is and delivers the goods virtually every time, then read the issues before Moore took over Wildcats, then read his run. There’s no greater evidence of why Moore is the best writer ever to work in comics. He can take any idea, or even the absence of one, and turn it into something professional, exciting and worth talking about. I re-read this run every few years, and its casual quality and absolute transformation of one of the shittiest comics ever published brings a smile to my face every time. You don’t think Moore is a magician? You need to read his Wildcats, my friend.  

Happy birthday, sir. And thank you.